Woodwork

 

dscn3706.jpgYou ever come home after being out of town to find your house filled with little guests?  And by little I mean tiny. That’s what happened to us after Thanksgiving this year.  We had an ant problem. I have no idea where they came from but what worried me more was that they didn’t “come” from anywhere but were there the whole time.

The phrase “come out of the woodwork” comes to mind. An etymological definition says that this saying is based on the idea of insects that suddenly come out from under boards in a house where they have been hidden. In other words, they’re not coming anywhere – they’ve been there the whole time.

That phrase tends to be passed around this time of year.  We’re getting ready for Badnje Vece (Christmas Eve) and if there’s a time of year that people come out of the woodwork it’s Badnje Vece. It’s a unique evening and worship service, particularly in the Serbian tradition, that combines both faith and culture. No one – not even the laziest churchgoer – can imagine not going to this service just as no one would dream of leaving without a piece of the Badnjak.

It’s when people literally come out of the woodwork. With all those great crowds and so many faces I wonder if we ever see any new faces on Badnje Vece? Maybe. For the most part, however, it’s only faces that have slightly changed since the last time we’ve seen them, which in some cases was the year before.

It’s like us when we were out of town and were surprised to find that our house wasn’t empty. Our churches only seem empty. In reality they’re full and over flowing, standing room only.

All they have to do is come out of the woodwork.